The 519 Podcast
Animal Hoarding: how it happens and what we can do

Animal Hoarding: how it happens and what we can do

May 12, 2022

A recent story out of Norfolk County told of a woman who was charged with animal cruelty after investigators found 27 dogs, 5 cats, 3 horses, two donkeys, 1 pig, and 1 guinea pig at her home

The story was startling and, for some, likely conjured up images of a real life Cruella DeVille. 

But when you take a closer look at stories like these - ones that involve what we often call ‘animal hoarding’ - it’s not hard to wonder how this can happen. 

Who in their right mind would fill their home with dozens of animals? 

In many cases, the people are not in their right mind. 

In this episode of the 519 Podcast, we learn more about animal hoarding from Kara Kelly of the CMHA Thames Valley Addiction and Mental Health Services and Liz White, president of the Animal Alliance of Canada.

The Donnellys: Vigilante Justice or Violent Anarchy, part 2

The Donnellys: Vigilante Justice or Violent Anarchy, part 2

April 28, 2022

They’re perhaps the 519’s most famous, or infamous, family.

Whether it’s from books, movies, TV or elsewhere, just about everyone in the area knows something about the Black Donnellys. 

On this two part series, the 519 Podcast examines their story, including how the massacre of the Lucan area family happened and whether this was 'Vigilante Justice or Violent Anarchy.'

The Donnellys: Vigilante Justice or Violent Anarchy, part 1

The Donnellys: Vigilante Justice or Violent Anarchy, part 1

April 28, 2022

They’re perhaps the 519’s most famous, or infamous, family.

Whether it’s from books, movies, TV or elsewhere, just about everyone in the area knows something about the Black Donnellys. 

On this two part series, the 519 Podcast examines their story, including how the massacre of the Lucan area family happened and whether this was 'Vigilante Justice or Violent Anarchy.'

Phones, Crypto, and Romances: The New Era of Scams

Phones, Crypto, and Romances: The New Era of Scams

April 14, 2022

During the last two years, there have been two things that Canadians could count on: the next wave of COVID-19, and being potential targets of scammers and fraudsters. 
The calls and texts can come once a day, maybe twice, or they could be scattered across weeks. But they always come. 
Fraudulent phone calls are out of control, and it’s no surprise that they’ve been costing Canadian’s millions of dollars.
And while the phone call scams have been growing, so has the creativity of the fraudsters.
We are now in the digital age of frauds and scams, which means potential problems are coming at us at home and at work - and millions of dollars have been lost.

This episode of the 519 Podcast looks at the variety of scams and how you can protect yourself. 

The Bizarre Kidnapping of John Labatt

The Bizarre Kidnapping of John Labatt

March 31, 2022

Most Canadians know the name Labatt. The name immediately brings up images of brown bottles of cold beer. 

But there are also a lot of Canadians who are unaware that the one-time head of Labatt Breweries was once the victim of what was then the most famous kidnapping in Canadian history. 

On this episode of The 519 Podcast, we look at the 1934 kidnapping near Sarnia of John Sackville Labatt, the 53-year-old grandson of the brewing empire's founder.  

Red Ryan vs. Sarnia Police

Red Ryan vs. Sarnia Police

March 17, 2022

Red Ryan was one of the most notorious criminals in Canadian history. He escaped from jail, got out of fight in the first World War and tricked the government into believing he had found religion - only to return to a life of crime each time. Ryan was eventually killed while robbing a liquor store in Sarnia in 1936.

In that same incident, Constable Jack Lewis, a Sarnia Police Officer, was also killed.

This week, the 519 Podcast tells their story.

The Windsor Blockade: fight for freedom or misguided mischief?

The Windsor Blockade: fight for freedom or misguided mischief?

March 3, 2022

There's a certain irony in a group of people protesting, among other things, a border policy they claim disrupts the supply chain when their protest actually did disrupt the supply chain and likely caused more problems for our economy than any sort of border crossing rule vaccine rule ever has.

For seven days, the Ambassador Bridge in Windsor was essentially shut down, causing massive economic repercussions on both sides of the Detroit River.

Some protesters claimed it was because of vaccine mandates, while others said it was COVID-19 restrictions in general, and some even said they wanted to replace the federal government.

No matter why these people were actually there, their presence caused a big problem.

On this episode of the 519 Podcast, we speak to a reporter who covered the blockade, Windsor's mayor, its deputy police chief, and an economist about the protest near the Ambassador Bridge.

The Ingersoll landfill: how a community fought back, and won

The Ingersoll landfill: how a community fought back, and won

February 17, 2022

In 2012, a company from the Niagara region called Walker Industries put forward a proposal for a  landfill just outside of the town of Ingersoll. It was to be located in an old limestone quarry and would take in garbage from around southern Ontario, much of it from the GTA. It would be Ontario’s 5th largest landfill and would take in 17 million tonnes of garbage in its proposed 20 year lifespan. 

But for many in the region, the landfill would be perilously and alarmingly close to the Thames River. 

There were concerns about the impact, not just on the health of the river, but also on the aquafer of the area, where many residents got their drinking water. 

The stage was set for a long-running battle between a company that wanted to fill an empty quarry with garbage and local residents who wanted no part of it. 

This is the story of how that community rose up, organized, and fought a years-long battle that it ultimately won.

Josiah Henson: Finding Freedom

Josiah Henson: Finding Freedom

February 3, 2022

When it comes to the history of this part of Ontario, there are so many incredibly interesting and compelling stories. 

There's the Donnelly massacre, the Amherstburg Rebellion, and the Victoria steamboat disaster. But some of the most interesting stories are the ones that don't get told very often. These stories often involve Black Canadians and Black people who came from the U.S. to escape slavery. 

There was a time when Ontario was seen as a safe haven for escaped slaves, and a place where their descendants could flourish and be truly free. Laws in Ontario were progressive for the era, and they provided safety. 

But, it’s important to recognize that laws are only as good as the people upholding them, and that while Black people escaped slavery by coming to Ontario, that doesn’t  necessariliy mean they escaped racism. 

And that’s as true now as it was in the 1800’s.

Perhaps that why it's important to have Black History Month, so that these stories get the attention they deserve. 

On this episode of the 519 Podcast, we tell one of those stories. 

This the story of Josiah Henson, an escaped slave who inspired Harriet Beecher Stowe to write Uncle Tom's Cabin.

Murder for Hire: the killing of Hanna Buxbaum, part 2

Murder for Hire: the killing of Hanna Buxbaum, part 2

January 20, 2022

In this second part of a two-part series on the murder of Hanna Buxbaum, we hear about the trial of Helmuth Buxbaum and the series of errors that made it easier for investigators to discover that he was the person who orchestrated the murder. 

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